The Religiosity of the Filipino Catholic Christians

IMG_0244

Photo: St. Joseph Cathedral, Butuan City, Philippines (courtesy of the author)

Surveys on Filipino religiosity by the Social Weather Station (SWS) had consistently revealed a more privatized faith for the Filipino Christians, i.e., a Christian faith focusing only on private spirituality and lacking in social involvement. The results revealed that most Filipinos consider themselves very religious, with very strong beliefs in the existence of God and higher level of participation in religious activities.

pexels-photo-1021145.jpeg

In particular, the Filipino youth (within ages 15 and 30) regarded themselves as religious (extremely religious 9%, very religious 29% and somewhat religious 49% or a total of 89%) in a 1996 SWS survey commissioned for the Philippine Youth Commission. This high level of religiosity is not, however, accompanied by a strong social involvement, particularly in organizational involvement. Only 12 percent of the Filipino youth are involved in church and religious organizations as well as in sports and recreational organizations. With regard to participation in charitable institutions, only 3% of the youth are involved.

IMG_0167

Photo credit: author

In general, most religiosity surveys revealed that the Filipino faith, although high in religious belief, lacked public character. Most of the popular Filipino religious practices are more oriented towards the individual and/or small circle of friends and relatives and lacking in structural dimension demanded by the CST.

Penitence

Photo: Filipino Christians doing in penitence during Holy Week in the Philippines (Source: http://thepinoywarrior.com)

The Filipino religious practice of penitensya (penitence) during Lent, for instance, encourages a pietistic and individualist orientation of faith. Though hugely popular, the devotion remains an individualist effort to atone one’s individual sin and lacking in social dimension. The popular devotion to the Black Nazarene in Quiapo is also devoid of liberational dimension. Many devotees participated in the devotion as a form of personal and familial gratitude due to some material favors they received from the Black Nazarene.

nazarene

Photo: The procession of the Black Nazarene of Quiapo (Source: http://theologasia.com)

Fernando Zialcita, a Filipino anthropologist, confirmed this pattern in his earlier study of the black Nazarene devotion. His informants revealed that the motivation in joining the Black Nazarene devotion is more materialist in nature, deviating from the Church’s official spiritual on devotion.  Filipinos rate themselves very high in religiosity and religious beliefs but they did not seem to relate them to social issues and problems as indicated by religiosity surveys and popular devotions in the country like the Black Nazarene.

IMG_1656

Photo credit: author

This finding is consistent with the study done by Dr. Ricardo Abad (2005) on the social capital of Filipinos: Filipinos tend to be affiliated more with their own smaller circles of relatives and friends and less in organizations and associations in the Church or in civil society. The Filipino Christianity is generally a privatized or personal one.

Sto. Nino

Photo: Sinulog procession in honor of the Sto. Nino in Cebu City, Philippines (Source:http://catholicleader.com.au)

The Second Plenary Council of the Philippines (PCP II) says that most of the people’s faith today is centered on the practice of the rites of popular piety and not on community and of building up of the world into the image of the Kingdom (PCP #13), specifically on building up of a faith community and involvement in social issues (PCP II#17). For this reason PCP II recommended a rigorous catechism of the “unchurched” or “nominal” Catholics, that is, the vast majority of Catholics in the Philippines who greatly lack knowledge and formation in the Christian faith, particularly on the Church’s social doctrines. Thus, catechism and Christian formation of Filipino Catholics on the social doctrines of the Church are, therefore, urgently needed in order to develop their Christian social conscience and  spirituality of social transformation.

pexels-photo-326709.jpeg

One must remember that the Christian faith is neither all about social activism and pietism nor solely about saving the individual’s soul, but a fine blend of spiritual and social struggle for the total liberation of the individual and society from all forms of personal and social sins. The Second Vatican Council emphasized that the mission of the Church in the contemporary world is helping human being to discover God as the ultimate meaning of his/her existence (CSDC #576). The Church’s mission is the total salvation of the individual and society from spiritual and material slavery.

Photo credit (except those with source): author, Pexels.com free photos

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4 Top Strategies in Courting Women

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Introduction

Two things to remember before courting a woman. First, dating is different from courtship, although they are related. Dating can lead to courtship. Second, it is important to court one woman at a time. Finally, courtship is not a game but a preparation for marriage for the Catholic Church.

1. Dating is different from courting

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Maybe one thinks that dating and courting are the same things, but actually, they’re very different. Dating is more casual, and he or she does not necessarily look for someone serious. Rather it’s just testing the waters and having fun, completely understandable.

Courting is based on the idea of eventual marriage. Okay, if one is just had a shiver up your spine reading the word, “marry,” I get it, it’s a big step. But courtship is really meant for those who are seriously looking for someone (Ivanovic).

2. You can only court one girl at a time

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One can’t be courting three girls at one time. It will not work. If one girl would know that your courting other girls, the guy would lose all his chances. So it’s important to just focus one’s attention on the one girl he is courting. If she’s not compatible then the guy must end the courtship and start courting someone else. If he courting a bunch of girls at once, his not really genuinely trying to get to know each one as well….” (Ivanovic).

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4 Top Strategies in Courting Women

1. Know the woman you’re courting: Do your homework. Do some background check before making your first move.

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This is the most important part in courting. Before taking a move, you should know your woman very well in order for you to get some idea on how to get on with her. The important things that you should know about her include her family, religion, friends, and personal background (Suminguit 12 Dec 2012).

2. Always pay attention to details when you’re  dealing with her.  Women love rose petals sprinkled on beds.  From little surprises to the opening of car doors, it’s the little things that women desire when they are being courted (Lovesujiery).

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3. Court when you’re thinking of marriage.

Don’t play games with the woman you’re courting. Courtship is a preparation for marriage. Close your eyes and think about it. Can you see this woman being your wife? If so, then why not give it a try and court her. You should really only be courting someone when you’re considering the idea of marrying them (Ivanovic).

4. Persistence pays in courtship: Sustained and persistent efforts in wooing a woman can make her fall in love in the long run.

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“Most women will fall in love to a guy that excels more efforts than those who are not. Efforts count more than anything that you can imagine. They are the weakness of women, the power of men. No matter how hard it will be, just don’t give up. Instead, excel more efforts.

Meet with her friends, or maybe her family. Visit her at home or go to a place she often visits. Love what she loves. Buy her flowers and chocolates without thinking that it is very crazy. Don’t you know that they love crazy stuff? It is just too cool for them.” (Suminguit 12 Dec 2012).

Catholic Church’s Teaching on Courtship

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Courtship is always a preparation for the Church. It’s a period of discovery whether 2 mature people are compatible for a lifelong commitment in the sacrament of matrimony. The longer the period of courtship, the better is the discovery period for the couple. Usually, it takes 2 or more years to know who the person one wishes to marry. Courtship can be a short period with a definitive end.  It ends either in an engagement or in the dissolution of the relationship (tradcatfem.com).

For the Church, building a chaste, holy marriage begins before one is married and the only legitimate reason for company-keeping is courtship, which is a preparation for marriage. Before embarking on a traditional Catholic courtship, both the man and the woman must ensure that they are both prepared, spiritually, financially, and mentally for marriage.

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Catholic marriage will take place only after the period of spiritual, mental and financial preparation has been completed by engaged couples  (tradcatfem.com).

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Photo Source: youtube.com

Photo Credit (except with attribution): Pixabay.com

References

Ivanovic, N. (n.d.). “How to Court a Woman: 15 Ways to Do It Like a Classy Gentleman”. LovePanky. Retrieved from https://www.lovepanky.com/men/attracting-and-dating-women/how-to-court-a-woman.

Lovesujiery (n.d.) “8 Ways women Want to be Courted by Men”. Babble. Retrieved from https://www.babble.com/relationships/8-ways-women-want-to-be-courted-by-men/.

Suminguit, R.J. (7 Dec 2012). “How to Court Your Girl in 5 Simple Steps”. BrighterYou:  Advice for Love. Retrieved from https://brighteryou.wordpress.com/2012/12/07/how-to-court-your-girl-in-5-simple-steps/.

________ (n.d.) “Stages of a Traditional Catholic Courtship”. Traditional Catholic Femininity. Retrieved from https://tradcatfem.com/2017/07/27/stages-of-traditional-catholic-courtship/.

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The Religiosity of the Filipino Catholic Christians

IMG_0244

Photo: St. Joseph Cathedral, Butuan City, Philippines (courtesy of the author)

Surveys on Filipino religiosity by the Social Weather Station (SWS) had consistently revealed a more privatized faith for the Filipino Christians, i.e., a Christian faith focusing only on private spirituality and lacking in social involvement. The results revealed that most Filipinos consider themselves very religious, with very strong beliefs in the existence of God and higher level of participation in religious activities.

pexels-photo-1021145.jpeg

In particular, the Filipino youth (within ages 15 and 30) regarded themselves as religious (extremely religious 9%, very religious 29% and somewhat religious 49% or a total of 89%) in a 1996 SWS survey commissioned for the Philippine Youth Commission. This high level of religiosity is not, however, accompanied by a strong social involvement, particularly in organizational involvement. Only 12 percent of the Filipino youth are involved in church and religious organizations as well as in sports and recreational organizations. With regard to participation in charitable institutions, only 3% of the youth are involved.

IMG_0167

Photo credit: author

In general, most religiosity surveys revealed that the Filipino faith, although high in religious belief, lacked public character. Most of the popular Filipino religious practices are more oriented towards the individual and/or small circle of friends and relatives and lacking in structural dimension demanded by the CST.

Penitence

Photo: Filipino Christians doing in penitence during Holy Week in the Philippines (Source: http://thepinoywarrior.com)

The Filipino religious practice of penitensya (penitence) during Lent, for instance, encourages a pietistic and individualist orientation of faith. Though hugely popular, the devotion remains an individualist effort to atone one’s individual sin and lacking in social dimension. The popular devotion to the Black Nazarene in Quiapo is also devoid of liberational dimension. Many devotees participated in the devotion as a form of personal and familial gratitude due to some material favors they received from the Black Nazarene.

nazarene

Photo: The procession of the Black Nazarene of Quiapo (Source: http://theologasia.com)

Fernando Zialcita, a Filipino anthropologist, confirmed this pattern in his earlier study of the black Nazarene devotion. His informants revealed that the motivation in joining the Black Nazarene devotion is more materialist in nature, deviating from the Church’s official spiritual on devotion.  Filipinos rate themselves very high in religiosity and religious beliefs but they did not seem to relate them to social issues and problems as indicated by religiosity surveys and popular devotions in the country like the Black Nazarene.

IMG_1656

Photo credit: author

This finding is consistent with the study done by Dr. Ricardo Abad (2005) on the social capital of Filipinos: Filipinos tend to be affiliated more with their own smaller circles of relatives and friends and less in organizations and associations in the Church or in civil society. The Filipino Christianity is generally a privatized or personal one.

Sto. Nino

Photo: Sinulog procession in honor of the Sto. Nino in Cebu City, Philippines (Source:http://catholicleader.com.au)

The Second Plenary Council of the Philippines (PCP II) says that most of the people’s faith today is centered on the practice of the rites of popular piety and not on community and of building up of the world into the image of the Kingdom (PCP #13), specifically on building up of a faith community and involvement in social issues (PCP II#17). For this reason PCP II recommended a rigorous catechism of the “unchurched” or “nominal” Catholics, that is, the vast majority of Catholics in the Philippines who greatly lack knowledge and formation in the Christian faith, particularly on the Church’s social doctrines. Thus, catechism and Christian formation of Filipino Catholics on the social doctrines of the Church are, therefore, urgently needed in order to develop their Christian social conscience and  spirituality of social transformation.

pexels-photo-326709.jpeg

One must remember that the Christian faith is neither all about social activism and pietism nor solely about saving the individual’s soul, but a fine blend of spiritual and social struggle for the total liberation of the individual and society from all forms of personal and social sins. The Second Vatican Council emphasized that the mission of the Church in the contemporary world is helping human being to discover God as the ultimate meaning of his/her existence (CSDC #576). The Church’s mission is the total salvation of the individual and society from spiritual and material slavery.

Photo credit (except those with source): author, Pexels.com free photos

Thank you for reading this post. Feel free to like, comment, and share this post. Sign up with our newsletter for more updates or follow this blog via email. No spam please! Cheers and God bless!

What Kind of Religiosity Filipino Christians Have?

IMG_0244

Photo: St. Joseph Cathedral, Butuan City, Philippines (courtesy of the author)

Surveys on Filipino religiosity by the Social Weather Station (SWS) had consistently revealed a more privatized faith for the Filipino Christians, i.e., a Christian faith focusing only on private spirituality and lacking in social involvement. The results revealed that most Filipinos consider themselves very religious, with very strong beliefs in the existence of God and higher level of participation in religious activities.

pexels-photo-1021145.jpeg

In particular, the Filipino youth (within ages 15 and 30) regarded themselves as religious (extremely religious 9%, very religious 29% and somewhat religious 49% or a total of 89%) in a 1996 SWS survey commissioned for the Philippine Youth Commission. This high level of religiosity is not, however, accompanied by a strong social involvement, particularly in organizational involvement. Only 12 percent of the Filipino youth are involved in church and religious organizations as well as in sports and recreational organizations. With regard to participation in charitable institutions, only 3% of the youth are involved.

IMG_0167

Photo credit: author

In general, most religiosity surveys revealed that the Filipino faith, although high in religious belief, lacked public character. Most of the popular Filipino religious practices are more oriented towards the individual and/or small circle of friends and relatives and lacking in structural dimension demanded by the CST.

Penitence

Photo: Filipino Christians doing in penitence during Holy Week in the Philippines (Source: http://thepinoywarrior.com)

The Filipino religious practice of penitensya (penitence) during Lent, for instance, encourages a pietistic and individualist orientation of faith. Though hugely popular, the devotion remains an individualist effort to atone one’s individual sin and lacking in social dimension. The popular devotion to the Black Nazarene in Quiapo is also devoid of liberational dimension. Many devotees participated in the devotion as a form of personal and familial gratitude due to some material favors they received from the Black Nazarene.

nazarene

Photo: The procession of the Black Nazarene of Quiapo (Source: http://theologasia.com)

Fernando Zialcita, a Filipino anthropologist, confirmed this pattern in his earlier study of the black Nazarene devotion. His informants revealed that the motivation in joining the Black Nazarene devotion is more materialist in nature, deviating from the Church’s official spiritual on devotion.  Filipinos rate themselves very high in religiosity and religious beliefs but they did not seem to relate them to social issues and problems as indicated by religiosity surveys and popular devotions in the country like the Black Nazarene.

IMG_1656

Photo credit: author

This finding is consistent with the study done by Dr. Ricardo Abad (2005) on the social capital of Filipinos: Filipinos tend to be affiliated more with their own smaller circles of relatives and friends and less in organizations and associations in the Church or in civil society. The Filipino Christianity is generally a privatized or personal one.

Sto. Nino

Photo: Sinulog procession in honor of the Sto. Nino in Cebu City, Philippines (Source:http://catholicleader.com.au)

The Second Plenary Council of the Philippines (PCP II) says that most of the people’s faith today is centered on the practice of the rites of popular piety and not on community and of building up of the world into the image of the Kingdom (PCP #13), specifically on building up of a faith community and involvement in social issues (PCP II#17). For this reason PCP II recommended a rigorous catechism of the “unchurched” or “nominal” Catholics, that is, the vast majority of Catholics in the Philippines who greatly lack knowledge and formation in the Christian faith, particularly on the Church’s social doctrines. Thus, catechism and Christian formation of Filipino Catholics on the social doctrines of the Church are, therefore, urgently needed in order to develop their Christian social conscience and  spirituality of social transformation.

pexels-photo-326709.jpeg

One must remember that the Christian faith is neither all about social activism and pietism nor solely about saving the individual’s soul, but a fine blend of spiritual and social struggle for the total liberation of the individual and society from all forms of personal and social sins. The Second Vatican Council emphasized that the mission of the Church in the contemporary world is helping human being to discover God as the ultimate meaning of his/her existence (CSDC #576). The Church’s mission is the total salvation of the individual and society from spiritual and material slavery.

Photo credit (except those with source): author, Pexels.com free photos

Thank you for reading this post. Feel free to like, comment, and share this post. Sign up with our newsletter for more updates or follow this blog via email. No spam please! Cheers and God bless!