What is the Spirituality of Social Transformation?

pexels-photo-415571

Understanding the Spirituality of Structural Transformation

The word “spirituality” can mean different things to many people. In essence, a spirituality in the Christian tradition is basically a way of life that imitates Christ’s life. Spirituality is a radical living of what one preaches, witnessing to the radical demands of the Gospel (PCP II, n. 282). The Second the Plenary Council of the Philippines speaks a particular type of spirituality for committed Christian to combat social and structural sins and transform society according to God’s plan–the spirituality of social transformation.

The Second Plenary Council of the Philippines (PCP II) seems too broad in describing of what precisely this spirituality of social transformation in actual social practice and how can this be practiced by ordinary Christians in daily life. It just described it as a way of life marked by an enduring and intimate commitment to Jesus, a love for him that does not count the cost (PCP II 278), a way of life that is constantly called to a profound transformation of one’s life and living the spirit of the Beatitudes in a world of poverty, oppression, exploitation, and conflict (PCP II#272).

pexels-photo-1058068

It is said to be a spirituality that is inspired by the preferential option for the poor, seeking the Kingdom as its primary rule, a spirituality that shares the Good News in the midst of deprivation, hope in situations of cynicism and pessimism (PCP II #280), and a spirituality that listens to and heeds God’s word, discerns and follows the Spirit in the Scriptures, in the Church and in history (PCP II 281).

Social Transformation as an Integral Part of the Christian Faith

adult-boy-child-325521.jpg

As mentioned above, the Christian faith is not pietistic and individualistic. It has a social or public dimension as this is witnessed in the context of a community. Evangelization is not only about saving the soul but saving the entire person with body and soul. Moreover, a person is not an isolated individual. S/he is a social being who lives in society. S/he influences society, but society also influences him/her. The Church preaches total salvation as the individual is intrinsically linked with the liberation of society from structural sins. Thus, to save the individual implies saving society. Now one cannot liberate society without having a spirituality of social transformation. If the orientation of the individual believer is purely pietistic and individualist, then it is less likely that s/he engages in social actions inspired by the Christian faith and by the teaching on the preferential option for the poor.

The Major Problem in Achieving the Spirituality of Social Transformation

The major problem with the concept of the spirituality of social transformation of PCP II is its lack of indicators of what exactly this spirituality is and how it can be lived out in a structured way by Christians in practical life. The priests and religious seem to have a structural privilege with regard to practicing their spiritual and prayer life. Their spirituality and mission are guided by the charism of their founders and religious orders and by the institutional teachings and rules of the Church. The institutional Church as well as the structures of religious orders have laid out some sort of structure that provide the fundamental principles and methodologies which support and sustain the kind of spirituality they want to live. Since the Church has already been bureaucratized, a fairly fixed structure has already been established by the institutional Church on how priests and religious can generally nurture and live out their spiritual life. In short, the kind of spirituality priests and religious want to pursue is aided by some formation or socialization structure to fully actualize it.

altar-architecture-art-161092

But this structured spirituality enjoy the religious and the clergy seems to be not the case for lay people. Structuring their own spirituality is not that easy, given the secularization of the world they live in and the diverse nature of their job, family, culture, and social class. There is no clear socialization structure on the kind of spirituality they want to pursue. It is still largely individualist in approach compared to priests and religious. Of course, they can always join some religious organizations or lay institutes to nurture the spirituality they aspire to achieve. But most of the time, the great multitudes of lay people are thrown in the world without being attached to some kind of a religious structure that continually nurture their spirituality. Given secular character and preoccupation of their vocation, lay people are often left alone to pattern their own spirituality with much the aid of a structure to regularize their formation process. With regard to the social teachings of the Church, they are often in their own personal discretion on how to actualize in the world what they learned from the Church’s teaching authority. Given the low level of awareness among Christians on the Catholic Social Teaching, it is uncertain whether the lay people do care at all to pattern their spirituality according to the Church’s social doctrine.

Some Practical Problems of a Spirituality of Social Transformation

pexels-photo-902288

First of all, the spirituality of social transformation proposed by PCP II sounds foreign to the religious and cultural awareness of many Filipinos who are more personalistic and kin-based in their cultural understanding of a community. This is one reason that they have a difficulty of understanding the Church as a “community of believers” who come from different ethnic, kinship, and cultural background. For most Filipino lay Catholics, the Church is the “sambahan” or “place of worship” and not the baptized community. A sociological research by Ricardo G. Abad on social capital reveals that Filipinos has difficulty of relating with the social world beyond the family, relatives and friends. This narrow and personalistic view of the community prevents Filipinos to be involved in something impersonal and abstract such as the state, the Church, government, or the society at large. That is why many Filipino Catholic do not find it necessary to do social or transformational action beyond the social circles of relatives and friends. If people are not well catechized on the CST, particularly on why and how the spirituality of social transformation be achieved and sustained, then this injunction of PCP II of seeing God in social liberation would only remain theoretical.

justice-law-case-hearing-159832

Another obstacle in the development of this spirituality, as pointed above, is ignorance of the laity on the social teachings of the Church. Correct theory or understanding is necessary in order to achieve correct or appropriate social action. How can people create and live out this spirituality of social transformation if they are ignorant of the social doctrines of the Church and their proper applications in society? And how can they learn these doctrines if they are not enough priests, religious, or lay teachers in the Church who can teach them? Sufficient and updated knowledge of the Church’s social teachings, a sound sociological knowledge and analysis of the social situation, a strong commitment to prayer life, and a social structure that guides social action as well as an ongoing Christian formation to believers and advocates are necessary to create a sound spirituality of social transformation. These are some of the important requirements in achieving the spirituality of social transformation.

Photo credit: Pexels.com free photos

Thanks for reading this post. Feel free to comment, like, and share it. Like us on Facebook  @theosociological or flow this blog via email.

A Story of Faith Amidst Poverty in a Relocation Area

IMG_2008

God does not want people to be poor. Poverty can make people preoccupied with subsistence or worldly concerns and mentally busy in satisfying one’s family needs. Poor Christians usually have limited time to pray and engage in religious activities, as well as resources to travel to holy places to enrich their spiritual lives compared to the rich. But the story of a disaster victim in the Philippines named Bettylene proved that one can still be religious in the midst of hardship and poverty.

I’m a sociologist and researcher. In one of my interviews for my research work on the religiosity of Filipino women who are victims of the Super Typhoon Ondoy (Tropical Storm Ketsana) in the Philippines, I encountered one poor woman named Bettylene. Her family was relocated in a remote resettlement built by the government in the Province of Rizal. Although a very poor woman, her strong faith in God is amazing. Typhoon victims in this relocation area suffer joblessness despite the government’s assurance that it will provide stable jobs and basic social services for the poor disaster victims.

Bettylene’s strong faith in God exemplifies the strong private religiosity of Filipinos women. International surveys on religiosity consistently identify the Philippines as the most religious country in the world in terms of personal beliefs in God and the Filipino women as the most religious group of Filipinos.

Bettylene’s strong faith in God despite extreme poverty in the relocation area for typhoon victims is an inspiration for me. Her personal struggle is one of the many stories of suffering, lack of jobs and sustainable livelihood program in government-owned relocation areas.

Bettylene

Photo: Bettylene  sitting on the doorsteps of the relocation chapel (courtesy of the author)

I met Bettylene in the relocation area when I went back to the site on that afternoon to see my two other key informants for my case study. She said she saw me in the morning conducting interviews with some disaster victims in the site. She said that she prayed hard in the afternoon just to see me coming back to the area.  She said that she has been at the corner of the entrance road leading to the relocation site, sitting on the entrance steps of the relocation chapel trying her luck to find me.  She said that her family had nothing to eat for supper on that evening and that she was worried for her husband and two young of her 6 children who were currently sick.  She was hoping that I could help her by providing some food for her family.

I think God answered her prayers. On that afternoon, I have brought with me some kilos of rice and canned goods which I usually give as a token of gratitude to my research informants after interviews. On our way to her home, she told me that her husband, the only breadwinner of the family, who worked as a casual construction worker in the relocation area, was just retrenched from his job, after his employer found out that he had a heart ailment. When we arrived at her house, I saw her husband had difficulty in breathing. Bettylene she said she could not bring him to the hospital. The nearest public hospital nearest to the relocation area was Amang Rodriguez Hospital in Marikina City.  But this hospital is around 30 kilometers away from the resettlement area. The family had no money even for the transportation fare. She said that urgent concern is what to eat for their next meal, especially that her husband is now sick and unemployed. She said that she was too hesitant to approach her relatives and friends for help since they too were very poor. Besides, they had already helped her many times and had lent her some money.

Bettylene2

Photo: The entrance of Bettylene’s relocation house (courtesy of the author)

Bettylene has no full-time or part-time job. She has no small trade in the area. She was totally dependent on the meager income of her husband as a casual construction worker.  She said she participated in soap-making seminars and other skills training in the relocation site. But there was capital or support from the sponsors or local government available to start her own small business. Asked about their future in the relocation site, she said:

I don’t know how we can continue to survive here in the relocation. God is our only hope. I trust that He will not abandon us. We are worried about our current conditions in the relocation site. The government has left us very vulnerable in the area: No permanent job, no sufficient income, and inadequate social and health facilities and services. Without God’s help, I don’t know what to do. How can our family needs be satisfied, especially that my husband now is unemployed and young children are still studying?

This story of Bettylene only illustrates that a strong faith in God can make people resilient, strong, resourceful, and hopeful even in very trying times, that extreme poverty cannot hinder poor people to continue to trust God. Indeed, faith is a great gift from God who generously provides material goods and spiritual strength to those who believe in Him. Did He not tell us with these words?

pexels-photo-208331

Photo credit: Pexels.com

 “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.  Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.  For my yoke is easy and my burden is light” (Matthew 11: 28-30).

Thank for reading this post. Sign up with out newsletter or follow this blog via email for more updates.

An Inspiring Story of Faith Amidst Poverty in a Relocation Area

IMG_2008

God does not want people to be poor. Poverty can make people preoccupied with subsistence or worldly concerns and mentally busy in satisfying one’s family needs. Poor Christians usually have limited time to pray and engage in religious activities, as well as resources to travel to holy places to enrich their spiritual lives compared to the rich. But the story of a disaster victim in the Philippines named Bettylene proved that one can still be religious in the midst of hardship and poverty.

I’m a sociologist and researcher. In one of my interviews for my research work on the religiosity of Filipino women who are victims of the Super Typhoon Ondoy (Tropical Storm Ketsana) in the Philippines, I encountered one poor woman named Bettylene. Her family was relocated in a remote resettlement built by the government in the Province of Rizal. Although a very poor woman, her strong faith in God is amazing. Typhoon victims in this relocation area suffer joblessness despite the government’s assurance that it will provide stable jobs and basic social services for the poor disaster victims.

Bettylene’s strong faith in God exemplifies the strong private religiosity of Filipinos women. International surveys on religiosity consistently identify the Philippines as the most religious country in the world in terms of personal beliefs in God and the Filipino women as the most religious group of Filipinos.

Bettylene’s strong faith in God despite extreme poverty in the relocation area for typhoon victims is an inspiration for me. Her personal struggle is one of the many stories of suffering, lack of jobs and sustainable livelihood program in government-owned relocation areas.

Bettylene

Photo: Bettylene  sitting on the doorsteps of the relocation chapel (courtesy of the author)

I met Bettylene in the relocation area when I went back to the site on that afternoon to see my two other key informants for my case study. She said she saw me in the morning conducting interviews with some disaster victims in the site. She said that she prayed hard in the afternoon just to see me coming back to the area.  She said that she has been at the corner of the entrance road leading to the relocation site, sitting on the entrance steps of the relocation chapel trying her luck to find me.  She said that her family had nothing to eat for supper on that evening and that she was worried for her husband and two young of her 6 children who were currently sick.  She was hoping that I could help her by providing some food for her family.

I think God answered her prayers. On that afternoon, I have brought with me some kilos of rice and canned goods which I usually give as a token of gratitude to my research informants after interviews. On our way to her home, she told me that her husband, the only breadwinner of the family, who worked as a casual construction worker in the relocation area, was just retrenched from his job, after his employer found out that he had a heart ailment. When we arrived at her house, I saw her husband had difficulty in breathing. Bettylene she said she could not bring him to the hospital. The nearest public hospital nearest to the relocation area was Amang Rodriguez Hospital in Marikina City.  But this hospital is around 30 kilometers away from the resettlement area. The family had no money even for the transportation fare. She said that urgent concern is what to eat for their next meal, especially that her husband is now sick and unemployed. She said that she was too hesitant to approach her relatives and friends for help since they too were very poor. Besides, they had already helped her many times and had lent her some money.

Bettylene2

Photo: The entrance of Bettylene’s relocation house (courtesy of the author)

Bettylene has no full-time or part-time job. She has no small trade in the area. She was totally dependent on the meager income of her husband as a casual construction worker.  She said she participated in soap-making seminars and other skills training in the relocation site. But there was capital or support from the sponsors or local government available to start her own small business. Asked about their future in the relocation site, she said:

I don’t know how we can continue to survive here in the relocation. God is our only hope. I trust that He will not abandon us. We are worried about our current conditions in the relocation site. The government has left us very vulnerable in the area: No permanent job, no sufficient income, and inadequate social and health facilities and services. Without God’s help, I don’t know what to do. How can our family needs be satisfied, especially that my husband now is unemployed and young children are still studying?

This story of Bettylene only illustrates that a strong faith in God can make people resilient, strong, resourceful, and hopeful even in very trying times, that extreme poverty cannot hinder poor people to continue to trust God. Indeed, faith is a great gift from God who generously provides material goods and spiritual strength to those who believe in Him. Did He not tell us with these words?

pexels-photo-208331

Photo credit: Pexels.com

 “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.  Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.  For my yoke is easy and my burden is light” (Matthew 11: 28-30).

Thank for reading this post. Sign up with out newsletter or follow this blog via email for more updates.

 

What is the Spirituality of Social Transformation? Can it be Attained?

pexels-photo-415571

Understanding the Spirituality of Structural Transformation

The word “spirituality” can mean different things to many people. In essence, a spirituality in the Christian tradition is basically a way of life that imitates Christ’s life. Spirituality is a radical living of what one preaches, witnessing to the radical demands of the Gospel (PCP II, n. 282). The Second the Plenary Council of the Philippines speaks a particular type of spirituality for committed Christian to combat social and structural sins and transform society according to God’s plan–the spirituality of social transformation.

The Second Plenary Council of the Philippines (PCP II) seems too broad in describing of what precisely this spirituality of social transformation in actual social practice and how can this be practiced by ordinary Christians in daily life. It just described it as a way of life marked by an enduring and intimate commitment to Jesus, a love for him that does not count the cost (PCP II 278), a way of life that is constantly called to a profound transformation of one’s life and living the spirit of the Beatitudes in a world of poverty, oppression, exploitation, and conflict (PCP II#272).

pexels-photo-1058068

It is said to be a spirituality that is inspired by the preferential option for the poor, seeking the Kingdom as its primary rule, a spirituality that shares the Good News in the midst of deprivation, hope in situations of cynicism and pessimism (PCP II #280), and a spirituality that listens to and heeds God’s word, discerns and follows the Spirit in the Scriptures, in the Church and in history (PCP II 281).

Social Transformation as an Integral Part of the Christian Faith

adult-boy-child-325521.jpg

 

 

As mentioned above, the Christian faith is not pietistic and individualistic. It has a social or public dimension as this is witnessed in the context of a community. Evangelization is not only about saving the soul but saving the entire person with body and soul. Moreover, a person is not an isolated individual. S/he is a social being who lives in society. S/he influences society, but society also influences him/her. The Church preaches total salvation as the individual is intrinsically linked with the liberation of society from structural sins. Thus, to save the individual implies saving society. Now one cannot liberate society without having a spirituality of social transformation. If the orientation of the individual believer is purely pietistic and individualist, then it is less likely that s/he engages in social actions inspired by the Christian faith and by the teaching on the preferential option for the poor.

The Major Problem in Achieving the Spirituality of Social Transformation

 

The major problem with the concept of the spirituality of social transformation of PCP II is its lack of indicators of what exactly this spirituality is and how it can be lived out in a structured way by Christians in practical life. The priests and religious seem to have a structural privilege with regard to practicing their spiritual and prayer life. Their spirituality and mission are guided by the charism of their founders and religious orders and by the institutional teachings and rules of the Church. The institutional Church as well as the structures of religious orders have laid out some sort of structure that provide the fundamental principles and methodologies which support and sustain the kind of spirituality they want to live. Since the Church has already been bureaucratized, a fairly fixed structure has already been established by the institutional Church on how priests and religious can generally nurture and live out their spiritual life. In short, the kind of spirituality priests and religious want to pursue is aided by some formation or socialization structure to fully actualize it.

altar-architecture-art-161092

 

 

But this structured spirituality enjoy the religious and the clergy seems to be not the case for lay people. Structuring their own spirituality is not that easy, given the secularization of the world they live in and the diverse nature of their job, family, culture, and social class. There is no clear socialization structure on the kind of spirituality they want to pursue. It is still largely individualist in approach compared to priests and religious. Of course, they can always join some religious organizations or lay institutes to nurture the spirituality they aspire to achieve. But most of the time, the great multitudes of lay people are thrown in the world without being attached to some kind of a religious structure that continually nurture their spirituality. Given secular character and preoccupation of their vocation, lay people are often left alone to pattern their own spirituality with much the aid of a structure to regularize their formation process. With regard to the social teachings of the Church, they are often in their own personal discretion on how to actualize in the world what they learned from the Church’s teaching authority. Given the low level of awareness among Christians on the Catholic Social Teaching, it is uncertain whether the lay people do care at all to pattern their spirituality according to the Church’s social doctrine.

Some Practical Problems of a Spirituality of Social Transformation

pexels-photo-902288

First of all, the spirituality of social transformation proposed by PCP II sounds foreign to the religious and cultural awareness of many Filipinos who are more personalistic and kin-based in their cultural understanding of a community. This is one reason that they have a difficulty of understanding the Church as a “community of believers” who come from different ethnic, kinship, and cultural background. For most Filipino lay Catholics, the Church is the “sambahan” or “place of worship” and not the baptized community. A sociological research by Ricardo G. Abad on social capital reveals that Filipinos has difficulty of relating with the social world beyond the family, relatives and friends. This narrow and personalistic view of the community prevents Filipinos to be involved in something impersonal and abstract such as the state, the Church, government, or the society at large. That is why many Filipino Catholic do not find it necessary to do social or transformational action beyond the social circles of relatives and friends. If people are not well catechized on the CST, particularly on why and how the spirituality of social transformation be achieved and sustained, then this injunction of PCP II of seeing God in social liberation would only remain theoretical.

justice-law-case-hearing-159832

Another obstacle in the development of this spirituality, as pointed above, is ignorance of the laity on the social teachings of the Church. Correct theory or understanding is necessary in order to achieve correct or appropriate social action. How can people create and live out this spirituality of social transformation if they are ignorant of the social doctrines of the Church and their proper applications in society? And how can they learn these doctrines if they are not enough priests, religious, or lay teachers in the Church who can teach them? Sufficient and updated knowledge of the Church’s social teachings, a sound sociological knowledge and analysis of the social situation, a strong commitment to prayer life, and a social structure that guides social action as well as an ongoing Christian formation to believers and advocates are necessary to create a sound spirituality of social transformation. These are some of the important requirements in achieving the spirituality of social transformation.

Photo credit: Pexels.com free photos

Thanks for reading this post. Feel free to comment, like, and share it. Like us on Facebook  @theosociological or flow this blog via email.

A Story of Faith in the Midst of Poverty in a Relocation Site

church-window-baptism-sacrament-glass-window.jpg

God does not want people to be poor. Poverty can make people preoccupied with subsistence or worldly concerns of finding the next meal to fight hunger and to be mentally busy in satisfying one’s family needs. The destitute and materially poor Christians are actually have limited time to pray and resources to travel to holy places to enrich their spirituality compared to the rich ones. They have less time to participate in public rituals, such as attending the Holy Mass, as well as joining the other activities of their Parish church.

pexels-photo-735446.jpeg

Because of the Biblical injunction that God blesses the poor, many Christians think that material poverty can make people humble and more trusting in God. This idea is a misunderstanding of the Gospel’s teaching on being “poor in spirit”. To be poor in the Biblical sense is simply to be detached from material wealth and being attached spiritually to God, whether one is rich or poor. We can see many poor people who are boastful, proud, and even oppressive to their fellow poor and even exploitative of their employers or rich patrons despite their being in the lower class!

pexels-photo-257037.jpeg

Poverty in spirit is an attitude towards wealth–not a social class position in society–which sees possession of material things as a means and not an end or purpose in life. It is also a form of spirituality, socially learned from one’s religious upbringing in the family, church, or local community. In the Bible, the anawim or the “Poor of Yahweh” are not mere religious individuals but a spiritual community with members, whether materially poor or rich, supporting one another in their faith. Spirituality has a social dimension. One cannot just become religious by being alone, without the social influence of one’s social groups or local community. People are social beings.

pexels-photo-923927.jpeg

Now, in one of my interviews for my study on the religiosity of Filipino women who were victims of the flood of Typhoon Ondoy (Tropical Storm Ketsana) in the Philippines, I encountered one poor woman named Aling Betty. Her family was relocated in a remote resettlement built by the government in the Province of Rizal. Because of corruption, typhoon victims in the relocation area suffer a lack of livelihood and jobs despite the government’s assurance that it will provide stable jobs and basic social services for the poor disaster victims.

Aling Betty’s strong faith in God exemplifies the strong private religiosity of Filipinos women. International surveys on religiosity consistently identify the Philippines as the most religious country in the world in terms of personal beliefs in God and the Filipino women as the most religious group of Filipinos.

pexels-photo-1031588.jpeg

Aling Betty’s strong faith in God despite extreme poverty in the relocation area for typhoon victims is an inspiring for me. Here’s what I’ve written about her story:

“The story of Aling Betty is one of the many stories of suffering, lack of jobs and sustainable livelihood program in government-owned relocation areas such as Southville 8A. Betty said she saw me conducting interviews in the site and she was hoping that after that I might come back that afternoon.

Click the link below. See for yourself the poverty and substandard houses for disaster victims in Aling Betty’s relocation site:

Southville 8 Relocation Site

Indeed, I went back to the site on that afternoon to check follow up my interview with two key informants. She said prayed and tried her lack to find me.  She said that she has been at the corner of the entrance road leading to  relocation site, sitting on the entrance steps of the relocation chapel.  She said that her family had nothing to eat for supper on that evening and that she was worried for her husband and two young of her 6 children who were sick.  She was hoping that I could help, at least in proving her some food for the family.

Luckily, I have some kilos of rice and canned goods  which I usually give as a token of gratitude to informants after interviews. I learned that her husband, the only breadwinner, who worked as a casual construction worker in the relocation area, was just terminated from his job because his employer found out that he has a heart ailment. Her husband experienced difficulty in breathing. Aling Betty she said she cannot brought him to a doctor for a check-up. The nearest public hospital at that time was Amang Rodriguez Hospital in Marikina City, around 25 kilometers away from the relocation site. They had no money even for the transportation fare. In fact, they worry for their next meal especially that her husband is now sick and unemployed. She said  that she was too shy to approach her neighbors and relatives for help since they too are very poor. Besides, they had already helped her many times and lent her some money.”

Aling Betty has no full-time or part-time job. She has no small trade in the area. She was totally dependent on the meager income of her husband as a casual construction worker.  She said she participated in soap-making seminars and other skills training in the relocation site. But there was capital or support from the sponsors or  local government available to start her own small business. Asked about their future in the relocation site, she said:

pexels-photo-568027.jpeg

Hindi ko po alam kung papaano pa kami mabubuhay dito sa relokasyon. Sa Diyos na lang kami umaasa na hindi niya kami pababayaan. Nag-aalala kami sa aming kalagayan sa ngayon sa pabahay. Napabayaan po kami ng gobyerno. Walang permanenteng trabaho, walang sapat na kita. Paano matutugunan ang aming pangangailangan lalo na sa mga batang nag-aaral pa, paano na ang kinabukasan nila?

Translation:

I don’t know how we can continue to survive here in the relocation. God is  our only our hope that He will not abandon us. We are worried about our current conditions in the housing. The government has abandoned us. No permanent job, no sufficient income. How can our needs be satisfied especially for our children who are still studying, what about their future?

Indeed, there are poor people who have strong faith in God despite extreme poverty and material deprivation. This is a gift that God provides to those who believe in Him. Didn’t he tell us with these words?

jesus-christ-good-shepherd-religion-161289.png

 “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.  Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.  For my yoke is easy and my burden is light” (Matthew 11: 28-30).

Photo credit: Pexels.com free photos.

Praise God for reading this post. Register to follow this blog or sign up with my newsletter for more updates. God bless!